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Cultural sustainability

Cultural sustainability
Did I mention that I'm tired of hearing the word 'sustainability'? The meaning has been washed so green that most people now associate it with environmentally friendly behavior, if that at all. And what that means is questionable in most cases. For me, however, the word goes much further. In my opinion, it includes all aspects of life that lead to the well-being of ALL people, not only on average, but in long term. This includes an intact planet, as well as safety and health. But if you think about it like this, there is one thing without which I would doubt my well-being and that of all other people. I think of cultural life. Our life without art, music, also sports in my opinion, language, history, fashion and all sub-forms and minor matters would be pretty boring and less worth living. It's not for nothing that there are e.g. film fundings, KSK, foundations and GEMA, whose basic goal is the promotion of cultural achievements. So if we want to live a sustainable life, we should be aware that this not only includes not destroying our planet, but also supporting what makes our senseless existence bearable;) With support i wouldn't mean financially in the first hand, but maybe simply by getting yourself to learn an extinct language, passing on your own knowledge about old cultures, telling the kids about the youth culture of your own childhood or a thousand other things that help to get the real accomplishments from us as human beings. In this context, I advocate a more conscious use of the word mentioned above and hope you can see the difference between "sustainable" and "well-intentioned".

Thanks for 2019!

Thanks for 2019!

When I said last year 2018 was a roller coaster ride, I obviously had no idea how this year would be! Starting in January at a very disappointing fair in Copenhagen, after which we were able to exhibit at the Blickfang in Hamburg again, the new articles  came in February just in time to raise my spirits again. In March we celebrated the first birthday of our showroom and in April we honored the victims of Rana Plaza with a special Fashion Revolution Week. So the year already promised some changes and that's why Manitober has expanded for the first time this year. Since this year I have also been able to count Nina and Anna to the team and together the summer went by quickly.

We were waiting for the new delivery for the winter, which unfortunately took much longer that expected - a real bummer. Thanks to our understanding customers who remained relaxed despite waiting for several months! Our first ‘right’ collection did not arrive in time, but was otherwise very well received. We banished all plastics from our supply chain and the rest of the year went very well despite all the adversities and my three weeks of absence. We want to take the spirit from this winter with us to take the next step next year: there is a lot on the agenda and we are just bubbling with ideas. Even if you could say that we actually only sell clothing, I hope that our view on the world, our pursuit to do things differently and not to orientate ourselves on existing structures can be a small, fine example. And we want to continue to improve in the new year, so whatever it is, overflow us with criticism and questions the shit out of us ;)

Thank you for being with us!

Cotton Candy: Thoughts on sustainability in fabrics with cotton and Lyocell

Cotton Candy: Thoughts on sustainability in fabrics with cotton and Lyocell

I understand that people are annoyed when something is dug up again, that actually is not as good as his reputation. Especially on the topic of climate protection, there are new bad news every day: avocados consume tons of water, streaming generates about 300 tons of CO2 / per year and now theres Manitober again and says that cotton is bad. Not per se, but the fiber consumes a lot of water before it turns into a T-shirt. In addition, it grows only in tropical, structurally weak regions of the world that are not necessarily nearby. We‘ve often said that most chemical fibers are derived from oil and thus from non-renewable raw materials. Cotton, on the other hand, keeps growing and therefore makes more sense. But we wouldn't be Manitober if that would be enough for us. That's why we've been talking  about how we can make T- and sweatshirts even better without sacrificing the familiar comfort. I read about "wood" T-shirts that are getting more popular. Of course, these t-shirts are not made of wood in the true sense, but of viscose, better LYOCELL, a fiber by Lenzing. These are spun from cellulose which can also be obtained from wood (actually from any plant). If this wood or bamboo is sustainably produced, the production of the fiber is more advantageous in terms of water consumption and CO2 balance despite the use of chemical additives. Anyone who ever had a garment made of viscose /lyocell or something similar in the hand, might have noticed the light touch, the shimmer and the velvety handle. In contrast to the cotton, which comes along rather pungent, it is already quite a big difference and I'll say it this way: a matter of taste ... The common wood shirts also come as a fiber blend therefore more difficult to recycle. You see, it's relatively difficult to judge what makes more sense now and whether we can't get any worse ... However, after some back and forth, we decided to make our T-shirts from a blend of 67% organic cotton in the future and 33% lyocell. It combines the care and wearing properties of viscose with the feel and look of cotton and has a lower impact on the environment... fingers crossed it‘ll be ready for the next season!!